More Fun With The GHD

The glute ham raise is not new movement.  Rather, it’s been used for decades to build strength throughout the posterior chain of muscles and specifically the hamstrings.  Because so many movements require strength and control of the posterior chain of muscles (deads, squats, cleans, snatches, jumping, running, rowing…), it’s worth investing a little extra time on the GHD and learning about your backside.

It would be wise to start by first developing a capacity with the hip extension and the back extension.  Because the glute ham raise requires you to maintain midline stability by engaging the abdominals and erectors of the back, it might also behoove you to develop a capacity with the AbMat or GHD sit-up.  If you are rocking perfect hip extensions and are more than capable with the other recommended movements, lay it out and let ‘er rip.

I recommend starting with the “buddy sub”.  Utilizing a super friend with the glut ham raise allows an athlete to effectively decrease the load on the hammier.  Feather your hands as you advance.  Awkward, yet awesome.  If you lack friends try the hip extension/glute ham raise or the drop knee method.  Each of these options are significantly easier than the full meal deal.  Start there and work towards building the strength needed to perform the movement properly.  There are other options, like bending the hip for the durations of the movement, but these will do as a start.

When, how often, and in what volume should you do glute ham raises?  Well, start with a couple of times a week doing 5×3 reps with a scaled option.  Build the reps over five sets until you are able to perform 6-8 reps for 5 sets.  Then try the progression over again with a more difficult option.  The glute ham raise is used best after the meat and potatoes of your workout are completed, while you’re somewhere between warmed-up and a little fatigued. I like finishing the day with glute ham raises and a little mobility.